A VALENTINE TO INTERIOR DESIGN: Current Trends & Design Elements we LOVE

There are several theories as to the origin of Valentine’s Day.  The Catholic Church recognizes at least three different saints named Valentine or Valentinus, two of whom were martyred on or around February 14th.  The holiday may also have been initiated as a Christian alternative to a pagan festival associated with fertility.  Although the roots of Valentine’s Day may not directly relate to the love and romance we associate with February today, a few of our designers are sharing some of their most beloved current trends or design elements that remind them of the spirit of the holiday.

Carrie Zirkle Loves Jewels – Jewel Tones That is!

I love adding pops of color whenever the opportunity allows and the current trend of incorporating jewel tones is a great way to add that extra “WOW” factor into a space. A hot trend for 2017, jewel tones can be used to improve any style or living space.  I typically recommend using these bold colors somewhat sparingly.  Jewel tones work well for an accent wall or even with accessories. You can also add the colors with upholstery, such as decorative pillows.   However, if you really want to go bold, One Kings Lane and Architectural Digest provide some great examples of jewel tones used for interior design.

Matthew Barley Counts Several Loves

Much like Elizabeth Barrett Browning in her famous poem, “How do I love thee? Let me count the ways,” Matthew Barley, enumerates a few of his design loves:

  1. I love white painted walls with white painted trim, because any knick-knack I find at an antique store or an existing piece of furniture will match instantly.
  2. I love joinery that uses brass and wood because of the harmony they create in juxtaposition.
  3. I love large spatial installations that blur the lines between architecture and furniture
  4. I love re-purposing old industrial equipment for residential applications because it’s great to give something a second life rather than throwing it away!
  5. I love to organize objects by color, just because I can.

Jessica Jack Finds a New Love!

Navy is my neutral; I simply never tire of seeing it in large or small doses. However, for the past few months, I have fallen head over heels for Emerald Green.  I love seeing this deep hue sprinkled in rooms of white or traced with golden metallics like in this Agate-look wallcovering. For more beautiful examples of my new favorite color, check out my Emerald Green Board on Pinterest.

And Reconnects with Past Loves

The re-emergence of pattern is also making my heart skip a beat. I have long loved to layer neutrals with small pops of decadent color, but the photos below–the emerald door opened into a beautiful navy and white patterned foyer or the layering of the emerald backsplash with the open wood shelves and copper accents–absolutely make my heart sing.

Lauren Rice Loves to Think Pink!

Valentine’s Day makes me think of pink. I love to use this often underappreciated color in my designs because it conveys the gentle emotions of joy, admiration, and gratitude.  Flowers, such as a light pink rose or deep pink carnation, provide natural inspiration and are symbols of grace and romance.

You can easily introduce pink into your space by using furniture, accessories or wall paint; just let your imagination flow!  Make your interior soothing by using a light shade, like the first two examples above. Conversely, if you want to bring a bold accent to your space, think about introducing hot pink as shown in the other photos.

Still unsure how to bring pink into your creative design? Here are examples of gorgeous color schemes which balance well with various pink hues.

Stacy Loves Romantic Details

I love to work interesting patterns and textures into design concepts whenever possible. In the spirit of Valentine’s Day, I’ve found a few images highlighting leather and lace which I like to think illustrate the strength and durability of true love combined with the intricacy and delicacy of matters of the heart. From a design standpoint, I love leather for the sense of luxury it creates and the way its natural texture and patina make you want to reach out and touch it.  Lace adds a softer, feminine aesthetic, but as illustrated by the photos below, can still be used in unique contemporary applications.

1. Lace fence by Studio Demakersvan combining the rough industrial look of metal fences with the feminine and fine structure of lace; 2. Urban Outfitters Headboard; 3. As lace continues to trend in the fashion world, Vervain’s Chantilly translates it into a woven panel stripe that mimics the intricate look of lace with a beautiful embroidery style weave effect.

Speaking of lace, some of the earliest Valentine’s Day cards featured real lace and ribbons.  Esther A. Howland began selling the first mass-produced valentines in America in the 1840s which were quite elaborate by today’s standards. Hallmark Cards of Kansas City, Missouri got in on the action in 1913.  Valentine’s Day is big business today, second only to Christmas for the number of cards purchased each year although most are apparently sent by women.  Hopefully that’s not due to men ignoring their sweethearts, but instead sending chocolate, flowers or other tokens of their affection.

Happy Valentine’s Day from RLPS!

Yet another tradition we LOVE at this time of year is wearing red to support the American Heart Association’s Go Red for Women campaign to help increase awareness of cardiovascular disease and lifestyle changes for prevention. Five numbers that everyone (not just women!) should know are Total Cholesterol, HDL (good) Cholesterol, Blood Pressure, Blood Sugar and Body Mass Index (BMI). Knowing these numbers can help determine individual risk for developing cardiovascular diseases.

Interested in learning more about the origins of Valentine’s Day?  We found a lot of background information and interesting trivia about the holiday at History of Valentine’s Day at History.com and NPR – The Dark History of Valentine’s Day.

Blog Editor:  Jodi Kreider, LEED AP

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